Book Review: Out Of My Mind By W. J. de Kock

Out Of My Mind by W. J. de Kock

A Genuine Re-Minding
Produces Genuine Re-Lifing

The language de Kock uses is different (regenerative theology) but the meaning is very similar to what we’ve come to know as spiritual formation.

But for de Kock it is more than a theoretical discussion. It’s personal. He lived regeneratively and shares his experience in Out of My Mind.

In this great read, life and theology come together. It combines biographical material – de Kock’s experience of transformation – with theology and history. The theology is modernist with an Apartheid flavor and the history focuses on the recent transformation of the South African society.

De Kock’s transformation is tied to and parallels that of South Africa, and the book gives a brief account of both.

One of my favorite words in the book is re-minding. It is beautiful but different way of saying repentance and de Kock’s case illustrates what that really means.

Because the book contained theology, it was a little dry in places but overall an insightful read.

The book is available in both hard cover and Kindle.

THINK!AboutIt

Book Review: Origins by Mark Henrikson

Origins by Mark Henrikson

Alternative History, No
Alternative Interpretation, Yes

Origins by Mark Henrikson is Sci-Fi with a twist. It is written from an alien perspective but is based on historical record (the biblical account of the Exodus).

It comes in two formats: paperback and ebook. Both available through Amazon. I received my copy free through BookBub.

The story’s timeline spans some three thousand years (plus/minus) beginning with the period just before the Exodus and extending into the present. The narrative alternates between the two ends of that period and follows four plot lines: aliens in Egypt, an alien (Hastelloy) visiting a psychologist in the present, an NSA agent (Mark) attempting to interfere with NASA’s deployment of communication devices and archeologists researching Egypt’s pyramids.

The book also makes reference to thousands of years prior. The lead character, Hastelly, is 25,000 years old. [Read more…]

Book Review: The Green Ember by S. D. Smith

The Green Ember by S. D. Smith

Designed For Children
Written For Everyone

The Green Ember is a great story written well. Rabbits are the heroes, wolves and hawks the villains.

The story is full of intrigue, adventure, action, mystery, surprise and struggle, but with a good mix of humor and playfulness. Written for children but in a way adults will enjoy.

The characters (the good guys) depict personal growth, sacrifice, humility, loyalty, trust, wisdom and dedication. The bad guys do what we expect bad guys to do. The story encourages us to visualize, believe in and work toward a future we cannot see.

Problems are created and resolved. Empathy is felt for those being wronged and disgust for those causing it. You’ll easily recognize and identify with the characters: the strong, the weak, the frustrated and the struggling.

Get a FREE Kindle Reading App for any device (PC, Mac, Smartphones, Tablets) at Amazon.com

A few phrases I loved: [Read more…]

7 Guidelines For An Amazon Book Review

You don't need to assassinate an author to disagree with his or her ideas.

Reviews Are
The Lifeblood
Of Book Sales

Amazon’s online review portal provides a great benefit for anyone looking to buy books but only because people say what they think.

And anyone can write a review. Anyone! The only qualifications are you bought – or borrowed – the book and read it.

But as with anything in life, there are Do’s and Don’ts that every reviewer should keep in mind, especially when it comes to books. Several are listed below.

These guidelines apply mostly to non-fiction but can be modified for fiction. [Read more…]

Notable Quotes from “To The Wall” by Mark van Straaten

To The Wall: A Journey In Missional Prayer by Mark van Straaten

A Well Said Point
Is Worth A Thousand Words

Pure prose, even when well written, can easily become long winded which in turn stifles rather than stimulates the thought processes. We’ve all been there.

That may be the reason poetry became so popular. It says a lot in very few words and very graphically. It’s hard not to like. But, theology doesn’t fit too well in poetic rhyme. It needs definition and explanation.

In recent times, however, the art of taking long drawn out, slow building concepts and encapsulating them in a few carefully chosen words has become popular. It is one way to reduce a big idea to one easy to remember sentence or phrase. That’s the idea behind headings also.

Get a FREE Kindle Reading App for any device (PC, Mac, Smartphones, Tablets) at Amazon.com

Mark does this often in “To The Wall” and I thought I would mention a few to give you a glimpse of what you can expect. [Read more…]